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Archive for March, 2014

James Walter Grimes Sr.James Walter Grimes Sr.
25 December 1903, Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio
(Photo courtesy of Eric Recht)

  James Walter Grimes Sr., (who went by Walter) was born 20 October 1869, in Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio. He was the youngest child and only son of Sarah A. Davis (1842-1898) and James O. Grimes (1822-1890), who was a prominent attorney in Ohio. His maternal aunt, Allie Davis Edwards (1846-1918), was my 2nd great grandmother, which makes him my 1st cousin 3 times removed.

  On 9 September 1891 he married Bertha Scott, daughter of Winfield Taylor Scott (1847-?) and Mary Ellen Burt (1849-1906), in Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio. My 2nd great grandfather, Hugh Barrett Edwards (1835-1908), performed the ceremony. The following  article appeared in the 17 September 1891 edition of the Cambridge Jeffersonian newspaper.

Grimes-Scott

  J.W. Grimes, son of the late J.O. Grimes, and Miss Bertha Scott, only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W.T. Scott, were united in marriage last Wednesday evening, at the home of the bride on East Wheeling Avenue. Rev. H.B. Edwards performed the ceremony in the presence of about seventy guests, after which an elegant supper was enjoyed by all.

  Those from a distance who were in attendance were: Walter Shipley, and sister Miss Ada Shipley, of Columbus, Ohio; Mr. Will Brown and, sisters, Martha and Mary of Senecaville, Ohio.

  The bride wore a beautiful dress of of rose silk with a white corsage, and the groom, of course, wore the conventional black. Many beautiful presents were received.

  They will reside with the brides parents during fall and winter. We extend congratulations.

James W. Grimes and Bertha Scott Marriage AnnouncementPublication: Cambridge Jeffersonian
Location: Cambridge, Ohio
Issue Date: September 17, 1891, pg #3

 

  Bertha and Walter found out in December of 1891 that they would become parents around August 1st the of following year. But in June of 1892,  on what had begun as a typical summer day, Walter’s life was changed forever. Bertha developed eclampsia and died one month before their baby was due.

Death of Mrs. Bertha Grimes

Last Thursday the friends and relatives of Mrs. Walter Grimes of this place were shocked to learn that she had been taken suddenly and fatally ill.  She had been in good health and spirits, and though on arising that morning she had not felt so well as usual, she was but slightly indisposed.  About 10 0’clock a.m. she was seized by a severe convulsion, and from then until about five o’clock p.m. she passed from one almost directly into another.  A physician was summoned at once upon the attack appearing and he remained with her constantly.

During the time that the convulsions continued it was thought that each would result in death.  After five 0’clock, the remedies administered seemed to be producing some effect, for the pulse of the patient became better, and ground for hope was found.

  About eleven o’clock in the night, a perfectly formed and well developed female child was born, and from thence onward until about twelve hours later, when she died, the sufferer sank away. The child lived until six o’clock Friday morning, and had she survived, she would have been named Margaret, for her dead grandmother. In the natural course, the child would not have been born until  about August 1st, and the immediate cause of death of Mrs. Grimes, as will appear from what has already been stated, was puerperal convulsions, resulting in the premature birth of the child. It is understood that the attending physician does not regard these as having been brought on by any accident or injury. but as having resulted in a constitutional disturbance which was not known beforehand.  The case was similar to that of Mrs. Lena White nee McBurnev.

    On Sunday afternoon at two o’clock, the funeral services under the direction of Dr. S. Burt, occurred at the house of the grief stricken parents, on Wheeling Ave. Appropriate and beautiful selections were sung by a choir, Rev F.A. Brown and Dr. McFarland, read scripture lessons, Dr. W.V. Milligan and Dr. Burt offered prayer, and touching remarks were made by Rev. L.B. Moore and Rev. H.B. Edwards, of Stuebenville, who had officiated at the wedding of Mr. and Mrs. Grimes, September 9, 1891.

  The interment was made to Cambridge Cemetery, and though the weather was sultry and rainy, many friends and relatives from a distance attended, and a long concourse followed the remains through the rain to the cemetery.  Mother and child were interred in the same casket.

    Mrs. Grimes was the only child of Winfield T. Scott and Mary E., daughter of the late William Burt, and was just approaching the 23rd year of her age, having been born January 19 1870. She was vivacious and sprightly in disposition, kind and womanly in manner, and a favorite with all of her friends.  Her death coming so unexpectedly and being so nearly tragic in its character, causes sorrow and sympathy throughout the town and vicinity.  If the bereavement could be added to by anything beyond the circumstances already indicated, it is made more crushing to the parents by the fact that during last winter Mrs. Margaret Burt, mother of Mrs. Scott, and a loved member of their family, was instantly killed by an accident upon the B. & O. railroad near Monroeville.

Mrs. Scott’s condition since Friday morning has been such as to arouse the greatest concern in the minds of her friends. She was so prostrated, that she has since been unable to leave the home, even to attend the interment.

Bertha Scott Obituary 1

Bertha Scott Obit 2

Bertha Scott Obituary 3

Bertha Scott Obituary 4Publication: Cambridge Jeffersonian
Location: Cambridge, Ohio
Issue Date: June 23, 1892, pg #3

City Cemetery, Cambridge, Guernsey, OhioOld City Cemetery, Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio
(Photo courtesy of Willis @ Findagrave.com)

The newspaper article above makes reference to the death of Margaret Rainey Burt (1827-1891), maternal grandmother of Bertha Scott, in a train accident in November of 1891. It also makes mention of Mary Scott’s (Bertha’s mother) emotional state.

” Mrs. Scott’s condition since Friday morning has been such as to arouse the greatest concern in the minds of her friends. She was so prostrated, that she has since been unable to leave the home, even to attend the interment.”

 Mary had lost three of the most important people in her world, quite unexpectedly,  in less than 8 months time and under incredibly dramatic circumstances. Her inability to attend the services comes as no surprise.

 The following is Margaret’s obituary from the Cambridge (Ohio) Jeffersonian Newspaper dated 22 October 1891.

Death of Mrs. Margaret Burt

Mrs. Margaret Burt, widow of William Burt, who died in Cambridge, May 22nd 1888, was killed in the terrible wreck on the B. & O. railroad at Hicksville.  She with her sister, Mrs. Simeon Davis, of Jackson township, this county, was returning from a visit with friends in the west, and they were passengers on the ill-fated train. Mrs. Davis and Mrs. Burt were occupying the same seat in the lady’s car when the crash came. Mrs. Davis was painfully, but not seriously, hurt and is now out of danger and rapidly recovering.  Mrs. Burt was so severely crushed about the head and breast as to be rendered unconscious, except to give her name and speak once till death relieved her agony.

  The news of the wreck soon reached Cambridge and her son in law, Winfield Scott, Esq., at once started for the scene.  He reported the situation and Mrs. Scott and daughter, Mrs. Grimes, hastened to reach the dying woman, but before they arrived, she was dead.  the suspense was very great pending the final result, and little else was thought of or talked about in Cambridge until a telegram announced the fatal termination.

  Upon the arrival of the train bearing the remains of  Mrs. Burt and the injured Mrs. Davis, a large crowd of friends and neighbors were in waiting and escorted the one, and tenderly bore the other upon a stretcher to the residence of Mr. Scott on East Wheeling Avenue, with whom Mrs. Burt resided since her husband’s death.  Universal sorrow prevailed, for Mrs. Burt was an amiable and lovely woman, sincerely loved by all who knew her.

  Loving hands had prepared the bruised and disfigured form for the casket and many tears were shed by those who gazed upon the cruel wounds that robbed her beautiful features of their wonted comeliness.

  The funeral services were largely attended.  Rev. L.B. Moore, her pastor, conducted them reading a scripture lesson and delivering a beautiful eulogy upon the life and character of the deceased.  Rev. Dr. Milligan led in an appropriate and earnest prayer; Rev. Dr. Burt spoke tenderly and beautifully; the choir of the Baptist church assisted by Mr.s Professor Sarchet sang in an anthem and appropriate hymns and the body was followed to the cemetery near the Cambridge Baptist church where her husband and other deceased relatives lay buried.  

  Mrs. Burt was a daughter of William and Mary Rainey, late of Jackson township this county; was born in Pennsylvania April 24th, 1827; came with her parents to this county in 1837; married to Wm. Burt,  February 21, 1848.  To them were born three children: James, who died in infancy; Asbury, who was killed by a boiler explosion east of Cambridge a few years ago, and Mary E., wife of Winfield Scott, who lives in Cambridge. She became a Christian more than forty years ago, was baptized by the venerable Baptist preacher Rev. Hugh Broom.  During the past twenty years she was connected with the church in Cambridge an was, as stated by her pastor, “an earnest, outspoken disciple, always in her place in church, deeply and intelligently interested in church work.”

  As a wife and mother, she was a model, ever cheerful and exemplary.  In youth, she was remarkably beautiful in form and feature, and this grace and loveliness of person were preserved through life, heightened by the dignity and force of an intellect and character of rare excellence, that won and held the love and respect of all with whom she came in contact, as relative, friend,  neighbor and Christian.

  Mr. Scott desires us to say that the family of Joseph cook, of Hicksville, with whom she was domiciled after the accident, showed every possible kindness and tenderness to her and Mrs. Davis; he says, “they could not have been more kind.”

Margaret Burt Obituary

Margaret Burt Obituary #2

Margaret Burt Obituary #3

Margaret Burt Obituary #4

Margaret Burt Obituary #5Publication: Cambridge Jeffersonian
Location: Cambridge, Ohio
Issue Date: October 22, 1891

    Walter remarried six years later  to Mary J. Green (1874-1969) on 11 May 1898 in Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio.  Among the wedding guests in attendance was his former mother-in-law, Mary Ellen Scott.

 Their marriage announcement appeared in the May 19th, 1898 edition of the Cambridge Jeffersonian.

Mary J. Green GrimesMary J. Green Grimes
25 December 1903, Cambridge, Guernsey, Ohio
(Photo courtesy of Eric Recht)

  The marriage of Mr. J.W. Grimes and Miss Mary Green occurred Wednesday at one o’clock a the beautiful country residence of the bride’s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Green, near Freeport, Harrison county.  The impressive but simple marriage ceremony of the M.E. church  was performed by Rev. H.B. Edwards, of Cambridge, uncle of the groom. The ceremony was performed in a corner bower of white and green, made from dogwood blossoms, blue and fragrant white lilacs.

  The house decorations were beautiful throughout and tastefully arranged; the mantels being banked with white lace and pine; the table decorations consisting of roses and violets; the favors of the occasion being carnations. After receiving the congratulations of the many guests, the entire company was escorted to the spacious dining rooms where an elaborate course dinner was served consisting of choice substantials and dainties.

  Mr. and Mrs. Grimes left Freeport on the evening train and came direct to their new home already furnished on Stuebenville Street.

 Mrs. Grimes is the accomplished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Green, and has lived in Freeport from childhood.  She is welcomed to Cambridge society and will become a valuable addition thereto.

  Mr. Grimes has grown up from infancy in Cambridge, and  is a member of the enterprising hardware firm of Carlisle and Grimes, and enjoys the respect and esteem of all who know him. We heartily congratulate the young married couple and bespeak for them a right royal welcome to our city.

  The guests from a distance were: Mr. B. Johnson and Miss Mary Cadwalinder, of Richmond Indiana; Mr. and Mrs. E. French, Damascue, Ohio; Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Green, Hartford City, Indiana; Mrs. P.W. Bailey, Spiceland, Indiana; Mrs. H.J. Hollway,  Miss Edith Conrow, and the Misses Hobson of Flushing, Ohio; Mrs. Maude Wherry of Elyria, Ohio; Mrs. Fred L. Rosemond, Miss Jessie Grimes, Mr. and Mrs. John H. Sarchet, Mrs C.J. Bonnell and son Paul, Mrs. W.T. Scott, Mr. and Mrs. L.E. Carlisle, Mr. and Mrs. E.P. Jones, and Mr. and Mrs. Charles A. Pace, Cambridge, Ohio.

James W. Grimes and Mary Green Wedding Announcement #1

James W. Grimes and Mary Green Wedding Announcement #2

James W. Grimes and Mary Green Wedding Announcement #3Publication: Cambridge Jeffersonian
Cambridge, Ohio
Issue Date: May 19, 1898

Walter, Mary, and their two children, Sara and James Jr.,  moved to Asheville, Buncombe, North Carolina in 1904, where he resided until his death on 11 October 1940 from heart disease.

 He is buried in Riverside Cemetery in Asheville, North Carolina.

James Walter Grimes Sr. Grave Stone

James Walter Grimes Sr. Gravestone

Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, Buncombe, North Carolina

Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, North Carolina

Riverside Cemetery, Asheville, Buncome, North Carolina (Photo courtesy of Richard Howell)

 

His second wife, Mary J. Green, died at age 95 on  22 April 1969 in Asheville, Buncombe, North Carolina.  She is also buried in Riverside Cemetery.

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Tree Heart Border

In March of 2002, my brother John and I went on a genealogy field trip to Vermont where our great grandfather, Harry McWhirter (1869-1940), was born.  At that time, I had been corresponding for over a year with a distant cousin, Bea Aldrich, regarding Blake family history. She was living in Derby, Vermont, just a few miles from the Vermont/Canadian border.  We met with her and she also allowed us to scan old family photographs she had in her possession.  She had many. =))

So many, in fact, that she had recently given a box full of old family photographs to a gentleman in Stanstead, Quebec, who was maintaining a repository for old photos that people didn’t know what to do with, but couldn’t bear to throw away.  When I expressed an interest in seeing those pictures as well, Bea called him and asked if he had time to see us.  He did. =)

He had converted an old gas station into a storage facility. There were rows of shelves, floor to ceiling, packed with boxes full of old photographs and memorabilia.  He led me to a table, brought me the box, and then left me alone.

Some of the faces I immediately recognized. With others, I recognized the names, and even knew some of their life stories, but that was the first time I had ever seen their faces.  I remember sitting there with tears streaming down my cheeks. Even now, as I write this, I find myself tearing up yet again at the memory.

I heard the gentleman in the next room on the phone, talking to my cousin Bea in Vermont. His end of the conversation went something like this:

“Hey Bea.  Yeah. Um, that lady you sent over? She’s here looking through the box of pictures you gave me, and, well…..she’s crying. Can I just give them to her?”

She agreed to let me have them. =)

This first photo is one of my favorites that came from that collection. The photograph is of my great grandfather Harry’s cousin, Charles Enoch Davis (1855-?)  and his oldest child Mabel E. Davis (1877-1955). Charles is a son of Dudley M. Davis (1822-1892) and Lydia Blake Davis (1827-1900) oldest sibling of Almira Blake McWhirter (1837-1871). I believe the photograph was taken around 1890.

I love this picture of father and daughter.

In March of 2002, my brother John and I went on a genealogy field trip to Vermont where our great grandfather, Harry McWhirter (1869-1940), was born.  At that time, I had been corresponding for over a year with a distant cousin, Bea Aldrich, regarding Blake family history. She was living in Derby, Vermont, just a few miles from the Vermont/Canadian border.  We met with her and she also allowed us to scan old family photographs she had in her possession.  She had many. =))

So many, in fact, that she had recently given a box full of old family photographs to a gentleman in Stanstead, Quebec, who was maintaining a repository for old photos that people didn’t know what to do with, but couldn’t bear to throw away.  When I expressed an interest in seeing those pictures as well, Bea called him and asked if he had time to see us.  He did. =)

He had converted an old gas station into a storage facility. There were rows of shelves, floor to ceiling, packed with boxes full of old photographs and memorabilia.  He led me to a table, brought me the box, and then left me alone.

Some of the faces I immediately recognized. With others, I recognized the names, and even knew some of their life stories, but that was the first time I had ever seen their faces.  I remember sitting there with tears streaming down my cheeks. Even now, as I write this, I find myself tearing up yet again at the memory.

I heard the gentleman in the next room on the phone, talking to my cousin Bea in Vermont. His end of the conversation went something like this:

“Hey Bea.  Yeah. Um, that lady you sent over? She’s here looking through the box of pictures  you gave me, and, well…..she’s crying. Can I  just give them to her?”

She agreed to let me have them. =)

This first photo is one of my favorites that came from that collection. The photograph is of my great grandfather Harry’s cousin, Charles Enoch Davis (1855-?)  and his oldest child Mabel E. Davis (1877-1955). Charles is a son of  Dudley M. Davis (1822-1892) and Lydia Blake Davis (1827-1900) oldest sibling of Almira Blake McWhirter (1837-1871). I believe the photograph was taken around 1890.

I  love this picture of father and daughter.

Charles and Mabel Davis (2)Charles E. Davis & Mabel E. Davis c 1890
(Photo courtesy of Beatrice Aldrich Nelson)

Charles married Mabel’s mother, Carrie M. Grow (1854-?), on 1  January 1877, in Charleston, Orleans, Vermont. Their first child, Mabel E. Davis, was born 25 December 1877 in Charleston, Orleans, Vermont. The couple’s second child, a son,  Bertie B. Davis was born 14 November 1885, in Derby, Orleans, Vermont.

This next photograph is of Mabel E. Davis and her 1st cousin once removed, Mary Zuba Barrett (1878-1955).  Mary was the daughter of  Eleanor “Nellie” Blake Barrett (1846-1942), youngest sister of Lydia Blake Davis (Mabel’s grandmother). The girls were born just six months apart.

I am including it here not only because Mabel is pictured in it, but also because I believe it speaks to how close the Blake family was.  At the time this picture was taken, Mabel Davis and her family lived in Charleston, Vermont, and Mary Barrett and her family lived in Titusville, Pennsylvania, a distance of  over 550 miles.

Mabel Davis,Mary Barrett (3)Mabel E. Davis & Mary Zuba Barrett c 1882
(Photo courtesy of Beatrice Aldrich Nelson)

The next record I found for Charles E. Davis is the U.S. Federal Census, taken 5 June 1900 in Manhattan, New York, New York. He is recorded as living in a boarding house, and widowed, indicating that Carrie died some time between 14 November of 1885 (the birth of their son) and 1 June 1900. I can find no record for either Carrie Grow Davis, or their son, after Bertie’s birth in November of 1885.

The U.S. Federal Census taken 23 June 1900 in Waunakee, Dane, Wisconsin, records Mabel Davis, age 22,  living with her cousins, Dr. Austin M. Blake (1864-1959), Ida Watson Blake (1865-1950), Samuel E. Blake (1893-1959), and Ruby R. Blake (1897-1982). 

Austin Morris BlakeDr. Austin Morris Blake c 1895
Waunakee, Wisconsin
(Photo courtesy of Beatrice Aldrich Nelson)

The Wisconsin State Census taken 1 June 1905 shows Mabel still living with Austin and Ida Blake, now age 26, and employed as the Postmistress for Waunakee, Wisconsin. I had found this record of her years ago, but could find  no trace of  her after that. I didn’t know if she had gotten married, moved back to Vermont, died, or all of the above. Until today.

While searching through old newspaper archives in Wisconsin for information on Austin Blake and his family,  I came across this wedding announcement for Mabel Davis and Anthony Patrick Kenney (1878-1944) in the Waunakee Index Newspaper dated 3 December 1906. The marriage took place in Waunakee, Wisconsin, on 26 November 1906, which was Thanksgiving Day.

KENNEY-DAVIS WEDDING

  Last Thursday morning at nine o’clock at St. John’s church in this village occurred the marriage of two of our most popular young people, Mr. Anthony P. Kenney and Miss Mabel Davis.  the solemn high mass was sung by the rev. Father John N. Shiltz, of Lodi.  A number of relatives and close friends of the contracting parties were present and witnesses the ceremony. Miss Agnes Rafferty of Token Creek, acted as bridesmaid, and Mr. T.K. Kenney of Madison, a brother of the groom, acted as best man.

  The bride was gowned in a beautiful dress of white French lawn and trimmed with Irish brocade, and the groom was dressed in conventional black. 

  Mr. Kenney is a native of Indiana, and after locating temporarily in Ohio for a few years, came to Waunakee in 1902 and was one of the founders of The Waunakee State Bank with which institution he has since served in the capacity as cashier. Since coming here he has won the friendship and respect of the entire community, and through his increasing work at the bank has been a very large factor in building up one of the largest and most substantial country banks in this section. Everyone has a kind word for Mr. Kenney.  

  Miss Davis claims Vermont as her native state, but for a number of years has made her home with Dr. A.M. Blake in this village. She was an assistant to Postmaster Riphahn for several years, and while serving in that capacity made the acquaintance and won the respect of the people of the entire neighborhood who speak of her only in highest praise and with one accord pronounce her a most estimable young lady. 

  The many friends of the bride and groom join with the INDEX in extending to them heartiest congratulations and wish them a long life of happiness and prosperity.

  Mr. and Mrs. Kenney left on the noon train for a short wedding trip to Chicago, returning Sunday evening. They will be at home in the house recently vacated by L.H. Stewart on Second Street, and their many friends will be pleased to welcome them as neighbors. 

Mabel Davis  & Anthony Kenney Marriage Announcement

Mabel Davis & Anthony Kenney Marriage Announcement #2Mabel Davis & Anthony Kenney Marriage Announcement #3Publication: Waunakee Index
Location: Waunakee, Wisconsin
Issue Date: December 3, 1908

Mabel’s husband, Anthony Patrick Kenney died 16 February 1944 at age 66, in Waunakee, Wisconsin.  This obituary appeared in the Madison, Wisconsin State Journal.  It reads in part:

A.P. Kenney Dies at 66

WAUNAKEE- A.P. Kenney, 66 organizer and cashier of the Waunakee State bank for 40 years, died at his home Thursday night after a long illness.

Survivors include his wife;  a son, Roger, Sheyboygan Falls; three grandchildren; a sister, Mrs. William Adang, Geneva, Ind., and three brothers, William, Kiliam, Canada; Peter, Newport, N.J., and Leo, in Alaska.

Funeral services will be held Saturday at 9 a.m. at the Kuestner Funeral Home, and at 9:30, St. John’s Catholic Church. The Reverend Michael Jacobs officiating.  Burial will be in the church cemetery.

Mr. Kenney was born in Geneva, Indiana, and lived there until 1896, when he entered University of Ada, Ohio. He  taught school, was graduated from Valparaiso College, Indiana, was on the staff of the Luther County, Indiana, Standard, and with the First National Bank at Galena, Illinois. 

He came to Waunakee in 1902, and with the residents formed the Waunakee State Bank, which he served as cashier until he retired in 1942.  He served as chairman of the bank board and continued an insurance business until he died.  

A.P. Kenney Obituary #1 Madison Tribune

A.P. Kenney Obituary #2 Madison TribunePublication: Madison Wisconsin State Journal
Location: Madison, Wisconsin
Issue Date: February 17, 1944

Anthony P. KenneyAnthony Patrick Kenney c 1944

And finally this last newspaper article that appeared in the Waunakee, Wisconsin Tribune on 10 February 1955, announcing the death of Mable Davis Kenney in Florida while living at the home of her son, Roger Kenney.

Mabel Davis Kenney Obit 1955

Mrs. Mabel Kenney, 75, Dies on February 2 in Florida

  Mrs. Mabel Kenney, 75, well known former resident of Waunakee for about fifty years, died at the hospital at Lake Wales, Florida, Wednesday, after an illness of two weeks.

Mrs Mabel Davis Kenney, the widow of A.P. Kenney, one of the founders and former cashier of the Waunakee State Bank, was born on December 25, 1878, in Charleston, Vermont.  She came to Waunakee when she was sixteen years of age, and made her home with the Dr. A.M. Blake family. She was united in marriage to Anthony P. Kenney on Thanksgiving Day,  November 26, 1907

She made her home in Sheboygan Falls for about eight years before going to Florida.

Mrs. Kenney was a member of St. John’s Christian Mother’s Society, the Waunakee Contract Bridge Club, and The Royal Neighbors of America.

Survivors include one son, Roger Kenney,  Lake Wales, Florida, and four grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Monday at 9 a.m. at the Schwab Funeral Home, and 9:30 at St. John’s Catholic Church, with the Rev. Raymond Ziegler officiating. Burial was in the church cemetery.

Pallbearers were John Klinglehofer, Edwin Kuestner, Henry L. Spahn, Leo J. Adler, Sam Murphy, and Edward Murphy.

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Tree Heart Border(Family Tree Heart designed by Rachel Halversen)

Both sides of my family are predominantly Irish, hailing from various counties in Ireland.  My paternal 2nd great grandfather, Nicholas Bergan, was  born in 1818 in County Kilkenny, Ireland.

County Kilkenny Ireland MapMap of County Kilkenny, Ireland

His wife, Anna Drew, was born 13 February 1830  in County Limerick, Ireland.  She emigrated to the United States in 1848, traveling directly to Peoria, Illinois. 

County_Limerick Map of County Limerick, Ireland

Nicholas Bergan married Anna Drew on 25 January 1851, in Peoria, Peoria, Illinois. He  became a naturalized citizen of the United States on 5 May 1856.

Nicholas Bergan Naturalization to US Record.jpgNicholas Bergan Naturalization Record, 5 May 1856

From 1850-1868 his occupation was given as a “Dray-man”. A dray is a low, flat-bed wagon without sides, pulled generally by horses or mules that were used for transport of all kinds of goods. He was sort of like the UPS/FED EX  guy of his day. The 1870 indicates that he had retired from this occupation by 15 June of that year.

Horse and Dray

Nicholas Bergan died May 1895 in Peoria, Peoria, Illinois. This very brief announcement of his death appeared in the Logansport, Indiana Daily Pharos newspaper on 24 May 1895.

Nicholas Bergan ObituaryNicholas Bergan Obituary

Nicholas is  buried in St. Mary Cemetery in  West Peoria, Illinois.

Nicholas Bergan GravestoneNicholas Bergan Gravestone
St. Mary Cemetery, West Peoria, Peoria, Illlinois

Anna Drew Bergan died 4 August 1897 in Peoria, Illinois, from heart disease, and was buried in St. Mary Cemetery, Peoria, Peoria, Illinois on 5 August 1897. The following obituary for Anna  appeared in the Peoria (Illinois) Daily Transcript on 5 August 1897.

Peoria Daily Transcript, 5 Aug 1897

Mrs. Anna Bergan, relict of Nicholas Bergan, died at her home at #617 North Jefferson Ave., at 2:00 yesterday afternoon of heart disease, aged 67 years. The funeral will be held Friday morning from the house to St. Mary’s Cathedral at 9:30 a.m. The Deceased was an old resident of Peoria and well known. She was born in County Limerick, Ireland, February 13 1830, and came to America in 1848, coming direct to Peoria, where she was married to Nicholas Bergan, who died in May 1895. Eight children survive as follows: Mrs. Patrick (Anna) Welsh and M.E. (Michael) Bergan, both of Kansas City, Mo., Theresa Bergan of San Francisco, CA, Mrs. B.A. (Bridget) Gallagher, Mrs. F.C. (Katherine) Misner, John P. Bergan, William. Bergan, and Patrick J. Bergan, all of Peoria.

Anna Drew Bergan Obituary 1897Anna Drew Bergan Obituary, 5 August 1897
Peoria (Illinois) Daily Transcript

Anna Drew Bergan Death CertificateAnna Drew Bergan Death Certificate, 4 August 1897

Anna Drew Bergan gravestoneAnna Drew Bergan Gravestone
St. Mary Cemetery, West Peoria, Peoria, Illinois

St. Mary's Cemetery, Peoria, IllinoisSt. Mary Cemetery, West Peoria, Peoria, Illinois

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Thomas/Krueger Ancestry

Family history for the Thomas and Krueger Families

Yellow Rose Productions

Where creativity is only the beginning

Hearts of the Fathers

Prepare thyself to search their fathers....shall not they teach thee, and tell thee, and utter words out of their hearts? Job 8:8-10

Aileen Rose

Prepare thyself to search their fathers....shall not they teach thee, and tell thee, and utter words out of their hearts? Job 8:8-10